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Sexuality history since 2000

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Birds do it, bees do it, humans since the dawn of time have done it. But just how much has the act really changed through the millennia and even in past decades? Are humans doing it more?

Are we doing it better? Sort of, say scientists. But it's how people fess up to the truth about their sex lives that has changed the most over the years. Humans have basically been the same anatomically for aboutyears—so what is safe to say is that if we enjoy it now, then so did our cave-dwelling ancestors and Sexuality history since 2000 else since, experts say.

Sexuality has a lot to do with our biological framework, agreed Joann Rodgers, director of media relations and lecturer at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. It is nearly impossible to tell, however, whether people enjoyed sex more 50 years ago or 50, years ago, said David Buss, professor of psychology at the University of Texas and author of "The Evolution of Desire: Strategies of Human Mating" Basic Books, There is "no reason to think that we do more now than in the past, although we are certainly more frank about it ," Buss told LiveScience.

Indeed, cultural restraints —rather than anything anatomical—have had the biggest effect on our sexual history, Shorter says. Desire surges from the body, the mind interprets what society will accept and what not, and the rest of the signals "Sexuality history since 2000" edited out by culture," he writes in his book, "Written in the Flesh: That's not to say that cultural norms keep people from exploring the taboo, but only what is admitted to openly, according to archaeologist Timothy Taylor of Great Britain's University of Bradford.

Religion especially has held powerful sway over the mind's attitude towards the body's carnal desires, most sexual psychologists Sexuality history since 2000. Men and women who lived during the pious Middle Ages were certainly affected by the fear of sin, Sexuality history since 2000 said, though he notes there were other inhibiting factors to consider, too.

He points especially to the 1, years of misery and disease—often accompanied by some very un-sexy smells and itching—that led up to the Industrial Revolution. Many historians and psychologists see the late s as a kind of watershed period for sexuality in the Western world. With the industrial revolution pushing more and more people together—literally—in dense, culturally-mixed neighborhoods, attitudes towards sex became more liberal.